White Manna "Come Down Safari" on Sunrise Ocean Bender / by captcha records

Humboldt’s   White Manna   not only shift to Captcha Records for their newest, ‘Come Down Safari,’ they adjust their temperature. Slightly. Not averse to a bit of blistering, White Manna’s previous outings have wallowed in the burn, if not excelling in burning a fat one. Or helping you do so. On ‘Come Down Safari’ they turn the knobs and wires to braise, a slow but potent simmer that arrives up front with the lengthy opener ‘Deathless Guru.’ It’s not quieter, or lighter, but it is elongated and seems more concerned with dispersion than deep space penetration and acceleration. ‘Deathless Guru’ rolls out like the red-eyed carpet for ‘Hassan’ which does pick up the pace, but seems to have its eye more on working a rolling rhythm. It’s the next logical step in the warm-up stride started by ‘Deathless Guru’ and a mind-set the rest of the album slips easily into. An unfolding cadence bubbles up repeatedly, one that feels organic even when ‘Come Down Safari’ takes a slow-bend detour like ‘The Sound of One Hand Clapping.’ A deceptively formless 5+minute interstellar squelch, ‘The Sound of One Hand Clapping’ sounds like the gears of Spaceship Earth grinding themselves into a different ratio, one they need for the ‘Welcome to Freedom Freeway’ and contorted revisit and re-imagining of the patient unfurling of ‘Deathless Guru.’ Here though the void warmth found in ‘Deathless Guru’ works into a mellow call and response squall that doesn’t end as so much lay down a gauntlet for the wonderfully titled ‘Hexagram of Goo’ to pick up. White Manna hasn’t avoided deep space by any means so far, but ‘Hexagram of Goo’ comes the closest to the far side of the sun, skirting and surfing on the edge of a vacuum fueled corona … before catching the solar flare wind-shear of the title track. ‘Come Down Safari’ has the most form and focus on the surface, but it’s a direct descendent as much as a result of everything that’s brought them this far. This is where all the accumulated dust and fragments from the rings they’ve been through aggregate in a swirl without letting the crust cool down. Aptly and indirectly titled, ‘Come Down Safari’ is simultaneously flight plan culmination and lift-off. The final cut brings it all to a head without resorting to wasted heat or unwarranted froth and shows just how much command is up in the nose cone. The vague conundrum of the parting shot sums up ‘Come Down Safari’ in intent as much as it satisfies the jones you should have for a band to deliver what you want … dishing up something different for them as much as for you, with all the ingredients they’ve already proved they can feed you. For White Manna heat is for cooking. Re-heating doesn’t enter the picture. Better yet, it doesn’t penetrate the orbit.

Humboldt’s White Manna not only shift to Captcha Records for their newest, ‘Come Down Safari,’ they adjust their temperature. Slightly. Not averse to a bit of blistering, White Manna’s previous outings have wallowed in the burn, if not excelling in burning a fat one. Or helping you do so. On ‘Come Down Safari’ they turn the knobs and wires to braise, a slow but potent simmer that arrives up front with the lengthy opener ‘Deathless Guru.’ It’s not quieter, or lighter, but it is elongated and seems more concerned with dispersion than deep space penetration and acceleration. ‘Deathless Guru’ rolls out like the red-eyed carpet for ‘Hassan’ which does pick up the pace, but seems to have its eye more on working a rolling rhythm. It’s the next logical step in the warm-up stride started by ‘Deathless Guru’ and a mind-set the rest of the album slips easily into. An unfolding cadence bubbles up repeatedly, one that feels organic even when ‘Come Down Safari’ takes a slow-bend detour like ‘The Sound of One Hand Clapping.’ A deceptively formless 5+minute interstellar squelch, ‘The Sound of One Hand Clapping’ sounds like the gears of Spaceship Earth grinding themselves into a different ratio, one they need for the ‘Welcome to Freedom Freeway’ and contorted revisit and re-imagining of the patient unfurling of ‘Deathless Guru.’ Here though the void warmth found in ‘Deathless Guru’ works into a mellow call and response squall that doesn’t end as so much lay down a gauntlet for the wonderfully titled ‘Hexagram of Goo’ to pick up. White Manna hasn’t avoided deep space by any means so far, but ‘Hexagram of Goo’ comes the closest to the far side of the sun, skirting and surfing on the edge of a vacuum fueled corona … before catching the solar flare wind-shear of the title track. ‘Come Down Safari’ has the most form and focus on the surface, but it’s a direct descendent as much as a result of everything that’s brought them this far. This is where all the accumulated dust and fragments from the rings they’ve been through aggregate in a swirl without letting the crust cool down. Aptly and indirectly titled, ‘Come Down Safari’ is simultaneously flight plan culmination and lift-off. The final cut brings it all to a head without resorting to wasted heat or unwarranted froth and shows just how much command is up in the nose cone. The vague conundrum of the parting shot sums up ‘Come Down Safari’ in intent as much as it satisfies the jones you should have for a band to deliver what you want … dishing up something different for them as much as for you, with all the ingredients they’ve already proved they can feed you. For White Manna heat is for cooking. Re-heating doesn’t enter the picture. Better yet, it doesn’t penetrate the orbit.

http://mratavist.com/2014/08/14/white-mannacome-down-safari/