WHITE MANNA/LIVE FREQUENCIES by captcha records

Though it pains me to say it, when I was growing up in California there wasn’t anything this good coming out of Humboldt. Well, relatively speaking … The Golden State didn’t have White Manna then, and it wasn’t because that was before electricity either. Though electricity plays a big part here and is used how the good lord intended. Coming in on the heels of ‘Come Down Safari,’ and almost reverse-lapping it as they do with each release it seems, White Manna bring ‘Live Frequencies’ through the conduit of Cardinal Fuzz Records. Recorded last Autumn on their European trek, ‘Live Frequencies’ offers documents from two appearances. Though there are a few repeated cuts, in the context of the album’s intent and delivery that’s a point so minor it barely warrants mentioning. If that is a sticking point for the fussy, rest assured by the time they roll around to repack you’d be dropping the needle back where you started the first time anyway. Fear of over baking? Please. It’s White Manna. Part of their trademark grind found on their studio recordings, even on the more laid back ‘Come Down Safari,’ is their gritty looseness and raw live vibe. You’re guaranteed not to get the same thing twice though it’s clear they have the focus, discipline and drive to do so. Rather than coming out of the gate with full pistons, ‘E Shra’ quietly coalesces the smoke and stars into a building pulse that quickly turns to a spine as the guitars begin the flares. It’s the sound of trajectory, effective trajectory for the song and album, rather than an inefficient expenditure of fuel. Combustibles are certainly thrown on the fire, but not as quick as you would think making the overall experience of the album far richer. ‘Acid Head’ works it’s determined mid-tempo chug showing again how good White Manna are at elevating the trip even while working a more methodical tangent. That’s not anything new by any means, but sometimes their intense raw, uncooked ‘cookedness’ is what is given the most attention. There’s no question they are a juggernaut, but there’s more behind the curtain than just blinding plasma engines. Point proved, so it’s time for acceleration and putting on the heat-shields with a blistering run through ‘Evil’ that should get the boil going in the chamber as well as the blood. ‘Live Frequencies’ continues to rise and fall on arcs of metal shavings and sparks with ‘X-Ray’ literally dragging you through its paces, creating a microcosm of its own with an internal rise and fall until full gear mesh on the ride out. When they first did their version of ‘I’m Comin’ Home’ it was as tasty as a brownie. To have it taken out of the oven again in a live setting relentlessly drives home how suited that song is for White Manna and how they do what you should do with a cover: make it your own and make it a love letter. Speaking of the love, we’d be lost without a return to ‘Sweet Jesus,’ a barnstorming ignition that rivals the man’s own light and offers salvation of the sonic kind. It’s fitting at this point that the circle remains unbroken with White Manna almost coming back to front heading into ‘G Shra.’ After ‘Sweet Jesus,’ which is a fitting close to any album, live or in studio, is where that needle we mentioned before would make its willing return. From this point on we revisit ‘Evil,’ ‘X Ray,’ and a get a second-helping of ‘Sweet Jesus’ just when you need—and want—him the most. Slathering on the puffery and going into flowery details here would give too much credence to the idea that White Manna are repeating themselves. They could, they can and they won’t. The pickings from both gigs not only make ‘Live Frequencies’ a fiery document of their European voyage for those fortunate enough to get the smoke blown in their faces and their hair blown back, but also serves as a succulently roasted snapshot of White Manna in flight. A flight they intriguingly tweaked on ‘Come Down Safari.’ Put both of those in your pipe and the smoke rings easily become proliferating orbits. White Manna’s frayed scope becomes larger as their focus gets beguilingly more laser and razor-sharp.

‘Live Frequencies’ is available on CD in a vinyl replica sleeve, as well as wax … which is sold out (of course) at Cardinal Fuzz. Try Captcha.

White Manna "Come Down Safari" on Sunrise Ocean Bender by captcha records

Humboldt’s White Manna not only shift to Captcha Records for their newest, ‘Come Down Safari,’ they adjust their temperature. Slightly. Not averse to a bit of blistering, White Manna’s previous outings have wallowed in the burn, if not excelling in burning a fat one. Or helping you do so. On ‘Come Down Safari’ they turn the knobs and wires to braise, a slow but potent simmer that arrives up front with the lengthy opener ‘Deathless Guru.’ It’s not quieter, or lighter, but it is elongated and seems more concerned with dispersion than deep space penetration and acceleration. ‘Deathless Guru’ rolls out like the red-eyed carpet for ‘Hassan’ which does pick up the pace, but seems to have its eye more on working a rolling rhythm. It’s the next logical step in the warm-up stride started by ‘Deathless Guru’ and a mind-set the rest of the album slips easily into. An unfolding cadence bubbles up repeatedly, one that feels organic even when ‘Come Down Safari’ takes a slow-bend detour like ‘The Sound of One Hand Clapping.’ A deceptively formless 5+minute interstellar squelch, ‘The Sound of One Hand Clapping’ sounds like the gears of Spaceship Earth grinding themselves into a different ratio, one they need for the ‘Welcome to Freedom Freeway’ and contorted revisit and re-imagining of the patient unfurling of ‘Deathless Guru.’ Here though the void warmth found in ‘Deathless Guru’ works into a mellow call and response squall that doesn’t end as so much lay down a gauntlet for the wonderfully titled ‘Hexagram of Goo’ to pick up. White Manna hasn’t avoided deep space by any means so far, but ‘Hexagram of Goo’ comes the closest to the far side of the sun, skirting and surfing on the edge of a vacuum fueled corona … before catching the solar flare wind-shear of the title track. ‘Come Down Safari’ has the most form and focus on the surface, but it’s a direct descendent as much as a result of everything that’s brought them this far. This is where all the accumulated dust and fragments from the rings they’ve been through aggregate in a swirl without letting the crust cool down. Aptly and indirectly titled, ‘Come Down Safari’ is simultaneously flight plan culmination and lift-off. The final cut brings it all to a head without resorting to wasted heat or unwarranted froth and shows just how much command is up in the nose cone. The vague conundrum of the parting shot sums up ‘Come Down Safari’ in intent as much as it satisfies the jones you should have for a band to deliver what you want … dishing up something different for them as much as for you, with all the ingredients they’ve already proved they can feed you. For White Manna heat is for cooking. Re-heating doesn’t enter the picture. Better yet, it doesn’t penetrate the orbit.

Humboldt’s White Manna not only shift to Captcha Records for their newest, ‘Come Down Safari,’ they adjust their temperature. Slightly. Not averse to a bit of blistering, White Manna’s previous outings have wallowed in the burn, if not excelling in burning a fat one. Or helping you do so. On ‘Come Down Safari’ they turn the knobs and wires to braise, a slow but potent simmer that arrives up front with the lengthy opener ‘Deathless Guru.’ It’s not quieter, or lighter, but it is elongated and seems more concerned with dispersion than deep space penetration and acceleration. ‘Deathless Guru’ rolls out like the red-eyed carpet for ‘Hassan’ which does pick up the pace, but seems to have its eye more on working a rolling rhythm. It’s the next logical step in the warm-up stride started by ‘Deathless Guru’ and a mind-set the rest of the album slips easily into. An unfolding cadence bubbles up repeatedly, one that feels organic even when ‘Come Down Safari’ takes a slow-bend detour like ‘The Sound of One Hand Clapping.’ A deceptively formless 5+minute interstellar squelch, ‘The Sound of One Hand Clapping’ sounds like the gears of Spaceship Earth grinding themselves into a different ratio, one they need for the ‘Welcome to Freedom Freeway’ and contorted revisit and re-imagining of the patient unfurling of ‘Deathless Guru.’ Here though the void warmth found in ‘Deathless Guru’ works into a mellow call and response squall that doesn’t end as so much lay down a gauntlet for the wonderfully titled ‘Hexagram of Goo’ to pick up. White Manna hasn’t avoided deep space by any means so far, but ‘Hexagram of Goo’ comes the closest to the far side of the sun, skirting and surfing on the edge of a vacuum fueled corona … before catching the solar flare wind-shear of the title track. ‘Come Down Safari’ has the most form and focus on the surface, but it’s a direct descendent as much as a result of everything that’s brought them this far. This is where all the accumulated dust and fragments from the rings they’ve been through aggregate in a swirl without letting the crust cool down. Aptly and indirectly titled, ‘Come Down Safari’ is simultaneously flight plan culmination and lift-off. The final cut brings it all to a head without resorting to wasted heat or unwarranted froth and shows just how much command is up in the nose cone. The vague conundrum of the parting shot sums up ‘Come Down Safari’ in intent as much as it satisfies the jones you should have for a band to deliver what you want … dishing up something different for them as much as for you, with all the ingredients they’ve already proved they can feed you. For White Manna heat is for cooking. Re-heating doesn’t enter the picture. Better yet, it doesn’t penetrate the orbit.

http://mratavist.com/2014/08/14/white-mannacome-down-safari/

A Grip of Lorelle Meets the Obsolete Reviews... by captcha records

Got some free time on your hands?  Check out all of these reviews!  Album of the year?! 

http://beardedmagazine.co.uk/index.php/albums/article/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers-sonic-cathedral

http://www.theskinny.co.uk/music/records/306751-lorelle_meets_obsolete_chambers

http://revoltoftheapes.com/2014/03/02/band-of-the-week-has-a-shadow-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete/

http://drownedinsound.com/releases/18075/reviews/4147411

http://www.roadburn.com/2014/03/album-day-lorelle-meets-obsolete-chambers/

http://thequietus.com/articles/14624-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers-review-2

http://www.thefourohfive.com/review/article/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers

http://www.anydecentmusic.com/review/6179/Lorelle-Meets-The-Obsolete-Chambers.aspx

http://www.musicomh.com/reviews/albums/lorelle-meets-obsolete-chambers

http://www.austinpsychfest.com/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-official-apf-2014-interview/

http://www.recordstore.co.uk/recordstore/Sonic-Cathedral/Chambers-Signed-Postcard/2VI003JG000

http://www.goldflakepaint.co.uk/review-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers/

http://www.thelineofbestfit.com/reviews/live-reviews/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-wharf-chambers-leeds-070414-150345

http://crackmagazine.net/music/world-exclusive-stream-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers-in-full/

http://www.offthetracks.co.nz/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers/

http://www.loudandquiet.com/2014/03/chambers-by-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete/

http://www.soundsbetterwithreverb.com/feature/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-interview/

http://www.albumoftheyear.org/album/13920-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers.php

http://www.sicmagazine.net/7373/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers/

http://www.whitetrashfastfood.com/events/6645-trinity-prsentiert-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete---the-vacant-lots

http://madmackerel.org/2014/03/06/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers/

http://cracklefeedback.com/artists/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete/chambers/

http://greylanternmcr.tumblr.com/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete

http://soundblab.com/reviews/albums/5568-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers

http://threebeams.co.uk/2014/03/17/album-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers/

http://aphroditelion.tumblr.com/post/77936298190/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers-album

http://soundblab.com/reviews/albums/5568-lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers

http://www.veggieburritos.com/2014/03/lorelle-meets-obsolete-chambers.html

http://www.bongmagazine.fr/?p=4854

http://thedriftrecordshop.net/products/lorelle-meets-the-obsolete-chambers

Sly Vinyl: Kikagaku Moyo / 幾何学模様 – S/T and Mammatus Clouds // Limited Colored Vinyl LP double pre-order bundle by captcha records

Tokyo’s premier sonic-chiefs Kikagaku Moyo provides a deeply spiritual and ritualistic psychedelic dish for your aural consumption, blending Japanese sounds with psychedelic peas, prog-potatoes, kraut-wurst, and experimental sauce. The outcome is quite the unique flavour, a real treat for the hungry tune-travellers out there. Highly recommended!

Kikagaku Moyo has gotten quite a lot of attention with their 3rd album “Forest Of Lost Children” released via Beyond Beyond is Beyond Records just about a month ago. They also did a US-tour prior to this wich turned out to be quite a success, including a performance on this years Austin Psych Fest.Captcha Records quickly smelled the fuzz, and is now releasing their first two albums on vinyl in the States for the first time.

The Limited Colored versions can only be ordered as a double dish, and will be pressed to the exact number of pre-orders! The official release is set to September 2nd, but there is no telling how long this window will stay open. I advice you to get in on this straight away.

Google Translates INDIE FOR BUNNIES review of Lorelle Meets the Obsolete by captcha records

Lui & Lei A classic. Steady, on stage and in life. Lorelle (ie Lorena Quintanilla ) and The Obsolete ( Alberto Gonzalez ). Mexicans in Guadalajara, psych rockers dream, hypnotic, an experimental thread. They mix different influences (shoegaze, garage rock and kraut on top of the list) under the hot sun of South America. Lorelle with his bass and sometimes guitar, the voice of a siren, a little ' Laetitia Sadier of Stereolab a bit 'Trish Keenan of Broadcast , a little ' Sanae Yamada of Moon Duo .Obsolete The wildcard does, playing and singing everything else when the leaves.

A large bell'esordio ("On Welfare" of 2011) that gave the sensation of looking at the world through the window of a passing alien ship bound for some fascinating distant galaxy; a second album ("corruptible Faces" came out last year) much more concrete. And now, "Chambers" album number three where Lorelle & The Obsolete complete the evolution away from the dreamy style of the early determination to discover a whole new one.

Ten pieces that seem to many rooms with views. Full board and you can choose where you want to sleep. The rousing "What's Holding You?" Owes much to the aforementioned Moon Duo ; "The Myth Of The Wise", "Music For Dozens", "Sealed Scene" and "13 Flowers" rather reminiscent of the rhythmic density of Spaceman 3 period "Playing With Fire" and represent the soul more strongly rock, melodic and distorted Alberto and Lorena . "I Can not Feel The Outside" and "Night Thoughts About Noon", strange divertissement mainly sung by The Obsolete, a nod to the playfulness of the Holy Wave and continuing the work begun with "The Obsolete Man" to "On Welfare" and again in "Morning Darkness" by "corruptible Faces". The most successful moments are still those in which The Lorelle & Obsolete return to get a ride between stars, lost in space and deep black ("Grieving," "Dead Leaves", "Third Wave").

The artistic career of Lorelle Meets The Obsolete resembles' that ofWooden Shjips : early work very much "free", free to explore harmonic and musical boundaries, then a gradual normalization with classic songs of the plant, much more accessible. Less and more psychedelic rock, the duo of Guadalajara confirms the good things he had already seen in the past while maintaining an independent and carefree attitude that has always characterized the production.

Has A Shadow does melody, repetition, reverberation, and distortion. by captcha records

Captcha Records expands their rather exciting catalogue with yet another fine piece of hypnotic noisy neo-psychedelia (yes, that old term that nowadays goes annoyingly by the term “shoegaze”), hailing from the totally-not-psychedelic city of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. It’s Has a Shadow: an assertive combo in terms of melody, repetition, reverberation, and distortion, that sounds able to headline any proper festival dedicated to the mind expansion through tinnitus.

With Sky is Hell Black, their brand new recording – on limited edition clear vinyl or digital download – the band dwells in the same seas as those of the Spacemen 3’s family tree, or more recent outfits like M O O N, Wooden Ships, The Black Angels, Dead Meadow and such.

With nine tracks of dazzling, lush sound dynamics, you get to feel spine-tickling churchey organs, fuzz-pedal atmospheres, pounding beats, lurking voices from the grave and cavern-deep echoes, that either take you in a wormhole space travel or an immersion to the bottom of your own mind.

Sky is Hell Black was recorded through the winter of 2012 in Mexico City, in a house where the band’s bassist, Victor “Remi” Garay used to live as a child. Alberto Gonzalez (Beto or “The Obsolete” from Mexican psych duo labelmates Lorelle Meets the Obsolete) was responsible for recording and mixing. Rodolfo Samperio played guitar, and Daniel Garciano played both guitar and electric organ in addition to providing the vocals.

The Obsolete also played the drums and contributed guitar tracks to some of the songs.

Right now is your chance to head over to their Bandcamp, because this is a collection of songs that certainly has to be some place inside your heart and mind, pulsing next to your heartbeat.

Spreading the word on Lorelle Meets the Obsolete by captcha records

Following their rapturously received European tour in September 2013 which saw them praised in the pages of NME and The Fly and played on BBC 6 Music, XFM, Amazing Radio and Absolute Radio Lorelle Meets The Obsolete release their third album, Chambers. It’s a surprisingly direct record which despite locking into a pulsating krautrock groove on What’s Holding You? or getting lost in a fog of white noise on recent teaser track Music For Dozens, always retains a very human heart and soul. There is diversity too; from the slide guitar and driving bass on the out of control rave up that is Sealed Scene to the narco-blues of Dead Leaves and the folky, melancholy Grieving.

"DREAMSALON, RECOMMENDED" - STILL SINGLE by captcha records

Over the past year or so, Dreamsalon has become Seattle’s most distinctive and most reliably good post-punk band, and this debut, Thirteen Nights is something of a minor classic. The group has extensive bloodlines (A Frames, Factums, The Lights, Le Sang Song, et many al) and includes three-fourths of the members of the late, near-great Evening Meetings. The eMeetings’ fantastic LP on Sweet Rot flew by in a flash amid a two-year flurry of semi-activity without expansion of interest beyond that of a certain sub-subsection of PacN’western show goers and a single NYC Tumblr blog editor. I suppose losing a member was a lynchpin to a stripped, breezier approach with less catharsis and more groove (read: they kept all of the boogie, but none of the blusey). Thirteen Nights contains a focused acuity not obvious within the ruckus of the live set; It should be noted that the live incarnation of Dreamsalon has a far more flanged-out and all ‘round overpowering sci-fi sound than the same track recorded on Thirteen Nights, and it’s a true testament to the quality of these songs that they thrive in this more common trad-rock sonic mix found on the record without the overdriven ballast and salesmanship of live performance. And there are a bunch of great songs on this thing, seemingly sequenced in descending order of light-to-dark, faster-to-dirgier.  The third song, “In the Air,” carries a breezy tune and sing-songy levity against an emotional neutrality of whatever I can make out of the lyrics. Other songs “Splits,” “Twenty More Days,” and the second side’s growling “On the Bus,” all belong on a frequented personal playlist titled BAD ASS that you should assemble right this minute.  All songs play out with a burrowing progressions laid down by bassist Min Yee who seems to similarly sculpt everything he’s involved in, and the compositions embrace a discipline in step with titans of late ‘70s/80s minor-chord American underground music, without actual rips requiring the need for shame. Sure, I s’pose one could point to individual moments or sound insertions directly referencing your Burmas or your Flippers or your Dream Syndicates, as if those bands were yours and existed in plural, but of course they aren’t and don’t. Heads-up: Dreamsalon has a second LP already completed, due late summer/fall 2014, provisionally entitled Soft Stab, but now is an excellent time to find an entry point for this fine band. (http://www.captcha-records.com
(Timothy Cook)

Sunrise Ocean Bender......on I N T R O D U C I N G . . . . /CAPTCHA RECORDS by captcha records

‘American cult label’ Captcha Records offers, as the title says, an introduction to their wares … If you’re only familiar with the obviously more psych heavy wares of Dahga Bloom, Camel Heads, Kikagaku Moyo or Lorelle Meets the Obsolete, you might be surprised by the dynamics of goods shored up by Le Corsage, ARU, and Fielded among others. Experimental, psychedelia, electronic, garage … It’s hard to pin down exactly what makes a label’s arsenal seem scattershot vs. diverse, but  I N T R O D U C I N G . . . .has that intangible ingredient that pushes it to the former. Maybe it’s charisma, maybe it’s luck … regardless, it works. Obviously not everything will hit a target with everyone (thank God), but the quality no matter the product line is impressive. More importantly, especially these days, is that it works for Captcha. They’re doing what they want, getting behind what they believe in … Let them tell you about it …

"Shoegazer's" Lorelle Meets the Obsolete on LatinoAmerica. by captcha records

In a relatively short time (but that if much work) the duo originally from Guadaljara, Mexico, Lorelle Meets the Obsolete has become one of the most important figures of Latin American alternative music (that by pigeonhole in a way), the reality is that this is not an easy project to catalog, Lorena Quintanilla and Alberto Gonzales have created a formula with his music including shoegaze, psychedelia and krautrock as main ingredients, all led to land and noise levels that are always unexpected.

RSTB takes a dose of Dahga Bloom by captcha records

Dahga Bloom roll in the storm with some real gas-choked, crank case type of psych; stinging the eyes, burning the throat and generally clear cutting whatever's in the path of their amplifier fury. Taking shades though Hawkwind territory but riding the Lords of Light vibe straight through the cosmic slop and far deeper into the frayed ends of the black hole, they know that volume + haze is a recipe for sonic bliss. The jagged edges greet the listener on impact but there are plenty of smoke-billowed vocals floating in the embryonic center of the vortex. No Curtains does a good job of translating the maelstrom to some sort of tangible form but its evident that the band live in the live realm, that these songs can only hope to be contained by their recorded versions. Still, as far as scorched earth psych goes in the dawn of 2014, this is as good as its sounds.

Has A Shadow and Lorelle Meets the Obsolete by captcha records

Here’s an album built for the long-haul, an eternal would-be mix-tape classic, over-modulated and (probably) under-appreciated. You should, by all means, cross paths with “Sky Is Hell Black.”

Nor do we have hesitation with calling “Chambers,” the latest album, one of the best of this year, or any year, really. Lorelle Meets the Obsolete clearly operate outside the constraints of time.